About citizenyang

http://law.scu.edu/faculty/profile/yang-tseming/

Summer Gardening

I don’t usually talk about my gardening, though my friends and students know how much I enjoy it, and I can’t resist here.  (Gardening is also a great way to appreciate the connection that we all have to the soil and earth – just ask my happy compost earthworms.)  I just came home from a long trip to Asia for conferences, meetings, and family visits and inspected my overgrown garden this morning.  My neighbors had been kind enough to look after our chicken and water the plants.  (When we were still living in Vermont, I would regularly walk my land . . . haha, all 2 acres it; it would be a quick walk; this morning was even quicker.) All the growth that’s happened is actually one of the most delightful things to discover after one has been away.   I found a championship-size zucchini (shoe/foot for scale; actual size was 20 inches), though it may not be edible anymore, as well as lots of tomatoes and ripe pluots from my “Flavor King” tree.  The pluots have an incredibly “perfumed” flavor – hard to describe, but I have never had anything like it in the supermarket.  (If you live in the San Jose area, I’ll be happy to share, though beware that most of them have already dropped.)  I am also a great garden-ripe tomato fan – there really is nothing better than summer tomatoes that have been ripened in the garden.  My Asian pear trees have also come along – there’ll be a bountyful harvest in a month or so!

There were also a couple of gardening lessons I was planning to pass along – things I learned the hard way this year. Hopefully, they will be of use to others.  But I will do that separately.

In the meantime, here are two other things I discovered in my travels — for your amusement. The first is the little upstart-cousin of the Ritz-Carlton (in Kuala Lumpur), and the second is the local (at the Kuala Lumpur airport) menu of Burger King — Taro pie and Pineapple pie (the local counterpart to the standard US apple pie).  I was only recently told by a student that BK and McD’s have local menu items in various countries around the world, so I have been looking out for them.

Position: Associate (Natural Resource Law), Downey Brand LLP, San Francisco (no deadline provided)

I just got this note from a former student about an open associate position for natural resource law at Downey Brand LLP.
Downey Brand LLP, is hiring a 3-6 year natural resources associate in San Francisco. If you know anyone that might be interested please feel free to put them in touch with me.

Position: City of Dallas, TX, Senior Climate Coordinator (Deadline: 5/30/2019)

This was an interesting position that was shared on a listserv that I am on.  I don’t know anything about it, but I think it might be of interest to environmental lawyers.

https://www.governmentjobs.com/careers/dallas/jobs/2447867/sr-climate-coordinator

 

Celebration of our Graduating Students Earning Social Justice Certificates

A wonderful ceremony by our Social Justice and Public Interest Law Center celebrating our graduating students, recognizing their achievements, and announcing the various public interest summer fellowships (39!!) awarded for pursuit of summer internships with public interest or government organizations.  Hannah Ford-Stille and Daniel Johnston also won the Herman Wildman Social Justice Law Writing Award.  And also recognition of student pro bono work over their three years in law school. And, of course, there was an inspiring speech, a call to arms in the service of the public interest, by Genie Harrison, a 1992 Santa Clara Law alum.  Congrats to all!  (Our commencement will happen this coming Saturday.)

Professor Kreitzberg on left and Dean/Interim Provost Kloppenberg on right

Our proud Social Justice Certificate graduates.

Center for Social Justice and Public Interest

Here is a direct link to the program brochure:  SocialJusticeCenterCelebMay16_2019

What Can University-Community Partnerships Contribute to EJ and the Common Good?

EJ_Logo_3-360x360We had a terrific conference here at Santa Clara University on environmental justice and university-community partnerships for research, learning and social change.  There were some great keynote speakers,  including Rachel Morello-Frosch of UC Berkeley, Patrice Simms of Earthjustice, Gustavo Aguirre of CRPE, and Fr. Pedro Walpole, S.J. of Ecojesuit.  There were also many terrific panelists (all listed on the agenda that can be found on the conference website).  Among the lawyers, it featured Veronica Eady, Assistant Executive Officer of the California Air Resources Board, Marianne Engelman-Lado of the Yale Law School Environmental Justice Clinic, and Helen Kang of the Golden Gate University Environmental Law and Justice Clinic discussing their experiences.  Santa Clara University’s President Michael Engh, S.J., gave the welcome remarks to the conference.  The second day included a discussion with Fr. Michael Garanzini, S.J., Secretary of Higher Education for the Society of Jesus, about a potential national and international network of Jesuit higher education institutions around environmental justice issues.

"How Can We Work Well Together" Panel

From left: Veronica Eady, Kimy Grandi Soriano, Jennifer Merritt, Jacky Riviera, Marianne Engelman-Lado, Martha Matsuoka, Chad Raphael.

The conference took the participants through the arc of university-community partnership issues beginning with a panel describing the state of environmental justice. The following panels then discussed examples of what community-university partnerships on environmental justice have accomplished (“What have we done together”), followed by post-lunch panels on the lessons and best practices those collaborations teach us (“How can we work well together”) and on the opportunities for future collaboration (“What could we do together”). The panel on future collaboration opportunities allowed a number of speakers to make pitches for potential projects.  The day concluded with a performance by Santa Clara’s Ballet Folclorico and a poster session and reception. The second day, the conference followed up on the project opportunity discussion as well as a more detailed session on the formation of potential national and international environmental justice-focused network within the context of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities as well as the International Association of Jesuit Universities.

The interest and enthusiasm about the conference resulted in more than a 200 participants as well as a great set of presentations on the success stories of community-engaged research for advancing environmental justice, especially concrete substantive accomplishment and improvements in public health, as well as the set-backs and many opportunities for further action.  The event was an exciting culmination of three years of effort on the part of my colleagues Professors Chris Bacon (Environmental Science & Studies), Ed Maurer (Engineering), Chad Raphael (Communications), Iris Stewart-Frey (Environmental Science & Studies), and myself (Law), which will hopefully mark the starting point for new and strengthened relationships, joint projects, and networks related to environmental justice.

 

Santa Clara Law Environmental Film Festival

We had a terrific environmental film festival today at Santa Clara Law.  The environmental documentary short films were created by students in my international environmental law course as an exercise in the use of multi-media story-telling and narratives as a tool of persuasion and advocacy.  I think the films thoroughly succeeded.  The line-up of films:

  1.  “Climate Refugees: A Global Issue,” Cynthia Anaya, Gina Santoni, Mahi Mangrio
  2. “How Cars Shape Our Lives,” Pepita Fallmann & Michael Lins
  3. “The Green New Deal,” Jordan Nunes
  4. “Lebanon is Drowning in its Own Waste,” Elsa Hajjar
  5. “Hong Kong, World of Contrasts,” Linnea Doan
  6. “Global Food Waste,” Cynthia Yuan & Kaushik Nagaraj
  7. “Swimming in a Sea of Plastic,” Daniel Tayakin & Jacqueline Ackerman

[I will add links to the student films as they are uploaded and become available.]

The Best Picture and Runner-up Awards were determined by a blue-ribbon jury, made up of Professors Ellen Kreitzberg, Ken Manaster, Cookie Ridolfi, and David Sloss.  The audience voted on the Audience Choice Award.

And the winners were (drum roll . . . ):

Best Picture: “Climate Refugees: A Global Issue,” Cynthia Anaya, Gina Santoni, Mahi Mangrio

Runner-up: “Global Food Waste,” Cynthia Yuan & Kaushik Nagaraj

Audience Choice: “Lebanon is Drowning in its Own Waste,” Elsa Hajjar

BestPicture (3)

(From left:  Gina Santoni, Professor Kreitzberg, Mahi Mangrio, Cynthia Anaya, Professor Ridolfi)

Runnerup (3)

(From left:  Prof. Kreitzberg, Cynthia Yuan, Prof. Ridolfi, Kaushik Nagaraj)