Santa Clara Law Environmental Film Festival

We had a terrific environmental film festival today at Santa Clara Law.  The environmental documentary short films were created by students in my international environmental law course as an exercise in the use of multi-media story-telling and narratives as a tool of persuasion and advocacy.  I think the films thoroughly succeeded.  The line-up of films:

  1.  “Climate Refugees: A Global Issue,” Cynthia Anaya, Gina Santoni, Mahi Mangrio
  2. “How Cars Shape Our Lives,” Pepita Fallmann & Michael Lins
  3. “The Green New Deal,” Jordan Nunes
  4. “Lebanon is Drowning in its Own Waste,” Elsa Hajjar
  5. “Hong Kong, World of Contrasts,” Linnea Doan
  6. “Global Food Waste,” Cynthia Yuan & Kaushik Nagaraj
  7. “Swimming in a Sea of Plastic,” Daniel Tayakin & Jacqueline Ackerman

[I will add links to the student films as they are uploaded and become available.]

The Best Picture and Runner-up Awards were determined by a blue-ribbon jury, made up of Professors Ellen Kreitzberg, Ken Manaster, Cookie Ridolfi, and David Sloss.  The audience voted on the Audience Choice Award.

And the winners were (drum roll . . . ):

Best Picture: “Climate Refugees: A Global Issue,” Cynthia Anaya, Gina Santoni, Mahi Mangrio

Runner-up: “Global Food Waste,” Cynthia Yuan & Kaushik Nagaraj

Audience Choice: “Lebanon is Drowning in its Own Waste,” Elsa Hajjar

BestPicture (3)

(From left:  Gina Santoni, Professor Kreitzberg, Mahi Mangrio, Cynthia Anaya, Professor Ridolfi)

Runnerup (3)

(From left:  Prof. Kreitzberg, Cynthia Yuan, Prof. Ridolfi, Kaushik Nagaraj)

 

Position: Aoki Water Justice Clinical Lecturer, Univ. Calif. Davis Law School (Deadline: May 19, 2019)

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT DAVIS SCHOOL OF LAW invites applications for a Water Justice Clinical Lecturer, who will act as the director of the Aoki Water Justice Clinic, by May 19, 2019 and/or until the position is filled. The Aoki Water Justice Clinic is a transactional live-client legal clinic that provides technical legal assistance to small disadvantaged communities in California’s Central Valley and beyond, who lack reliable and affordable access to safe drinking water. We seek applications from candidates with a background in law who (1) possess extensive experience in state, national and international critical race and nation studies law and policy issues and (2) excellent transactional, analytical, legal writing, negotiation and advocacy skills, including high-quality precision in contract drafting, and skill in high-level and detailed analysis. All candidates must apply through the UC Recruit system at the following link: https://recruit.ucdavis.edu/JPF02783. For full consideration, applicants should apply by May 19, 2019, although we recommend that you submit your materials as soon as possible. Candidates must have a J.D. or equivalent degree. We require a cover letter and curriculum vitae and contact information for three references at this time. In addition, as part of their application, candidates must include a Statement of Contributions to Diversity. Information about the Statement can be found at http://academicaffairs.ucdavis.edu/diversity/equity_inclusion/index.html. An optional statement of teaching can also be included. Please note that we may require further documentation at a future date, including, but not limited to, letters of recommendation, which will be treated as confidential per University of California Policy and California state law. Please direct questions to Director of Clinical Legal Education Gabriel “Jack” Chin, Chair of the Search Committee, via email at gjchin@ucdavis.edu. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, age or protected veteran status. For the complete University of California nondiscrimination and affirmative action policy, see https://policy.ucop.edu/doc/4000376/DiscHarassAffirmAction.

Fellowship: Land Use/Sustainable Development Graduate Fellow, Pace Law School (Deadline: no deadline available)

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Pace University’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law is hiring a Land Use and Sustainable Development Law Graduate Fellow for the 2019-2020 academic year. The Fellow will work part time in Pace’s Land Use Law Center while working towards an LLM in Environmental Law.

 

For more information, visit https://law.pace.edu/graduate/llm-graduate-fellowships.

Since 1978, Pace University’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law has provided an internationally acclaimed environmental legal education. Our dedicated faculty have been pioneers in developing and implementing environmental law and continue to serve as national and world leaders in the field. We are the only top environmental law program that is about forty minutes away by train from New York City and two hours away by air from Washington, DC, providing students with easy access to outstanding practice opportunities.  Fellows receive a full tuition waiver and a modest stipend to cover living expenses. Applications for the Land Use and Sustainable Development Fellowship are due April 30, 2019.

About the Land Use Law Center for Sustainable Development (For more information, visit law.pace.edu/landuse)

Established in 1993, the Land Use Law Center is dedicated to fostering the development of sustainable communities and regions through the promotion of innovative land use strategies and dispute resolution techniques. The Center provides research, training, technical assistance, support and strategic planning services to communities.  Working with trained law students, the Center quickly, affordably and effectively develops techniques to remedy nearly all types of land use problems that afflict urban, suburban and rural communities.  The Center enjoys a track record of successful implementation in partnership with local land use leaders, other change agents, and state and federal agencies.

It accomplishes this through its programs and catalytic demonstration projects, which cover a range of topics, including:

  • Local Environmental Law and Natural Resource Conservation
  • Historic Building and Agricultural Land Preservation
  • Smart Growth
  • Community Economic Development
  • Urban Revitalization
  • Affordable, Fair and Workforce Housing
  • Vacant and Distressed Property Remediation
  • Transit Oriented Development
  • Sustainable Site and Neighborhood Development
  • Green Building Programs
  • Local Wind and Solar Energy Regulation
  • Sea Level Rise
  • Community Resiliency
  • Climate Change Mitigation
  • Collaborative Decision-Making and Facilitation

Santa Clara Environmental Law Society Annual Spring Symposium on “Technology and the Environment”

We had a terrific ELS symposium at Santa Clara with faculty and outside experts on “Technology and the Environment.”  Expertly organized by ELS Co-President Cynthia Yuan, the panel of faculty and experts included SCU Law Professors Dorothy Glancy and Catherine Sandoval, Professor and children’s rights advocate Tom Nazario of USF Law School, Patent Attorney and Monterey Bay Air Resources District Hearing Board Chair Michael Guth, and SCU Alum and Cal Public Utilities Commission staffer Jamie Ormond.  [Unfortunately, we did not get a group picture, and I only caught Professor Sandoval and part of the audience in these images.  Apologies to all others present.]

Presentations focused on the value of enhanced wireless communications infrastructure for under-served populations, especially as a means for enhancing environmental disaster response (Sandoval), the serious environmental harms to local populations (especially children) and the environment caused by electronic waste exports to the developing world, especially Africa and Asia (Nazario), questions as to the potential environmental benefits and costs of new technologies such as autonomous vehicles (Glancy), ongoing challenges and needs to address the environmental risks of “old” technologies (such traditional power plants), and opportunities for use of technology in reducing the carbon footprint of energy use (Ormond).  Overall, a really interesting set of discussions and questions and hopefully also inspirational for the students who attended.

Environmental Film Festival at Santa Clara Law School, Wednesday, April 24, 12-1 pm, Charney Hall 104

If you are in the Santa Clara area, please join us at a April 24 Film Festival of environmental short films made by Santa Clara Law Students.  (Location is Charney Hall 104, 12-1 pm, April 24, 2019.)  Topics include “Lebanon’s Waste Problem,” “Sustainable Transportation Policy in the US and Europe,” and other films.  A blue-ribbon jury of SCU Law faculty (including Professor Ellen Kreitzberg, Cookie Ridolfi, and others) will judge the film entries, and the audience will be able to vote for an audience film award.

Come to this fun event!

FilmFestivalPoster2

Environmental Justice and the Common Good: A Conference on Community-University Partnerships for Research, Learning and Social Change, Santa Clara University, May 2-3, 2019

EJ_Logo_3-360x360On May 2-3, 2019, Santa Clara University is holding an environmental justice conference entitled on “Community-University Partnerships for Research, Learning and Social Change.” The substantive focus of the focus will be on how universities can partner with communities on research, learning and other activities advancing social change related to environmental justice.  There will be opportunities to engage in dialogue among conference participants and presenters.  (Unfortunately, the deadline for poster presentation slots has already passed.)  Conference speakers include environmental justice activists, academics and officials.  If you have an interest in this topic,  please join us.  Conference agenda, speaker information, and a registration link can be found here:  Conference Link.

Here is an excerpt from the conference website:

Mounting scientific evidence shows that low-income communities and communities of color face severe and unequal threats to their environments and health. Pope Francis issued a call to action for people and the environment in his groundbreaking encyclical ‘Laudato Si’. In response, this conference will focus on strengthening university-community partnerships for environmental justice and the common good.

Learning from successful collaborations and networks, we aim to develop diverse and mutually respectful partnerships between communities and universities to produce research, inform policy, and foster social change for environmental justice. The conference organizers — a faculty collaborative formed by the Ignatian Center for Jesuit Education at Santa Clara University — are especially inspired by the collective potential within the network of over 190 Jesuit institutions of higher learning worldwide.

Conference panels will include community-based organizers from secular and faith-based institutions reflecting on opportunities to work together for environmental justice. Breakout sessions will focus on envisioning potential research partnerships among conference participants, providing opportunities to make new connections and explore collaborations. Participants are also invited to present relevant research at a concluding poster session.

The day after the conference, there will be a workshop focused on building networks for environmental justice and integral ecology, with two tracks. Track 1 will focus on building a regional environmental justice network of leaders from community-based organizations, and faculty and staff from Santa Clara University and other California universities. We will consolidate takeaways from the conference, identify needs for sustained engagement in partnerships, and plan a process to develop collaborative research and action agendas. In track 2, faculty, staff, and administrators in Jesuit higher education will make plans to coordinate our scholarship, service, and education to foster environmental justice and the common good. This will focus on expanding the work of the AJCU Integral Ecology Affinity Group nationally and internationally.